12.7.2017
We are honored to be selected for the Worldwide Design Services IDIQ Contract by the Department of State’s Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO) | View more

We are honored to be selected for the Worldwide Design Services IDIQ Contract by the Department of State’s Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO)

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11.21.2017
Mark Cavagnero Associates is honored to rank in Architect magazine’s THE ARCHITECT 50 list of top architecture firms in the country for design. The firm ranks #2… | View more

Mark Cavagnero Associates is honored to rank in Architect magazine’s THE ARCHITECT 50 list of top architecture firms in the country for design. The firm ranks #2 in Business

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11.11.2017
Designing flexible spaces, keeping unobstructed views on the highest occupiable space in San Francisco. “I like to think of this as the world’s greatest living room,” said… | View more

Designing flexible spaces, keeping unobstructed views on the highest occupiable space in San Francisco.
“I like to think of this as the world’s greatest living room,” said Elizabeth Pinkham, head of Salesforce’s global real estate.

Designed by Mark Cavagnero Associates.

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9.15.2017
The San Francisco Public Safety Campus is awarded with the National AIA Justice Facilities Award! Jury Comments: “This is a strong civic landmark with with clear and… | View more

The San Francisco Public Safety Campus is awarded with the National AIA Justice Facilities Award!

Jury Comments:

“This is a strong civic landmark with with clear and restrained exterior massing and planning. Considering that the new building is much larger, the design is surprisingly sensitive to the existing fire station in scale. Its use of solar shading devices is well integrated into the overall design.”

Learn more about the San Francisco Public Safety Campus here.

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9.11.2017
The latest piece of the puzzle is a 200,000-square-foot structure at Third and Howard streets that includes a 55,000-square-foot, column-free ballroom, a glassed-in lobby with 24-foot ceilings,… | View more

The latest piece of the puzzle is a 200,000-square-foot structure at Third and Howard streets that includes a 55,000-square-foot, column-free ballroom, a glassed-in lobby with 24-foot ceilings, and an elevator landing that floats above the increasingly busy corner. The third floor is devoted to meeting rooms tucked behind a long outdoor terrace that makes the front of the newcomer less monolithic.

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7.24.2017
Violence has a long history in U.S. schools, with recorded incidences dating back to the early-20th century. More recently, the concept of active shooters armed with military-grade… | View more

Violence has a long history in U.S. schools, with recorded incidences dating back to the early-20th century. More recently, the concept of active shooters armed with military-grade weapons has found a permanent home in the American landscape. And that is changing how schools are designed.
Russell Davidson, principal and president of KG&D Architects, in Mount Kisco, NY, and former president of the American Institute of Architects, said that AIA members have been designing for security for some time now. These days, however, lessons learned from military and embassy projects have made their way into planning for K-12 schools and religious facilities, in particular.
As schools increase their security, however, the challenge is to make students feel like they’re still in a school setting rather than a prison or military installation.

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7.19.2017
Professional Profile: Mark Cavagnero 2017 | View more

Professional Profile: Mark Cavagnero 2017

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7.5.2017
As Salesforce Tower nears completion, the plaza that will accompany it has been shorn of two eye-catching features: a grove of redwood trees and a 40-foot-tall sculpture… | View more

As Salesforce Tower nears completion, the plaza that will accompany it has been shorn of two eye-catching features: a grove of redwood trees and a 40-foot-tall sculpture made from chunks of recycled concrete.
Instead, the half-acre space at Mission and Fremont streets will be handsomely paved but almost entirely open — a change instigated by Salesforce but agreed to by public officials. They welcome the idea of an uncluttered path to the new Transbay Transit Center, which should open next spring on the plaza’s south edge.

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6.1.2017
Architectural firm Mark Cavagnero Associates is located in San Francisco, and its principal, Mark Cavagnero, has watched the Live/Work/Play trend gather steam as the demands of the… | View more

Architectural firm Mark Cavagnero Associates is located in San Francisco, and its principal, Mark Cavagnero, has watched the Live/Work/Play trend gather steam as the demands of the modern workplace have workers spending more time at their jobs. Cavagnero says business clients now want to offer social spaces and better recreation and wellness options while also offering casual work environments that improve productivity by making employees comfortable.

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5.31.2017
After working on the Lighthouse for the Blind project in San Francisco, Mark Cavagnero, founder and president of Mark Cavagnero Associates, shares details of this transforming experience. Cavagnero… | View more

After working on the Lighthouse for the Blind project in San Francisco, Mark Cavagnero, founder and president of Mark Cavagnero Associates, shares details of this transforming experience. Cavagnero explores the new range of sensitivities that had to be considered and the materials that were the right solution. He talks about how this unique project taught the firm to respond to the finer intricacies of human interaction and interfaces.

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5.1.2017
“We don’t need your help, we need better design.” This was the challenge issued for the new headquarters for the San Francisco LightHouse for the Blind and… | View more

“We don’t need your help, we need better design.” This was the challenge issued for the new headquarters for the San Francisco LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired. The team was tasked with designing a new 40,000 GSF center as a positive and energetic place for people new to sight loss and a thriving new gathering spot for the Bay Area’s blind and visually impaired. The challenge was for more than mere compliance with ADA yet the solution could not be overtly adaptive or condescending. The design needed to address the needs and opportunities for people with limited or no vision with a sense of delight that did not assume or privilege sight.

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4.26.2017
The new 300,000-square-foot Public Safety Campus located in the city’s burgeoning Mission Bay neighborhood comprises a new headquarters for the San Francisco Police Department, the relocated Southern… | View more

The new 300,000-square-foot Public Safety Campus located in the city’s burgeoning Mission Bay neighborhood comprises a new headquarters for the San Francisco Police Department, the relocated Southern District police station, and a new Mission Bay fire station. The state-of-the-art facility will ensure the city’s uninterrupted access to essential services and establish an important presence in one of the city’s newest redevelopment areas. Located along the busy Third Street corridor between Mission Rock and China Basin Streets, the building is designed to blend into the neighborhood’s future low- to mid-rise residential and mixed-use development, while establishing a distinct presence befitting a significant landmark.

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4.25.2017
LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, one of the oldest social-services organizations in California, is on the forefront of technology and training for blind and low-vision… | View more

LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, one of the oldest social-services organizations in California, is on the forefront of technology and training for blind and low-vision individuals. The LightHouse needed a new headquarters that would allow them to expand their services and provide an uplifting, positive environment; through the thoughtful integration of acoustics, materials, and technology, the new LightHouse headquarters is designed to function well for blind users while being beautiful for the blind and sighted alike.

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4.1.2017
The new Diane B. Wilsey Center for Opera is located directly above a popular 900-seat music and performing-arts venue. Once home of the San Francisco Museum of… | View more

The new Diane B. Wilsey Center for Opera is located directly above a popular 900-seat music and performing-arts venue. Once home of the San Francisco Museum of Art (now SFMOMA), the existing space consisted of gracious, skylit galleries and a central 4,600-square-foot sculpture court. After SFMOMA moved out in 1995, it was used as a law library, but then fell into disuse. Following historic-preservation guidelines, the design team’s intervention highlights the original interior and also adds the necessary functionality.

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3.29.2017
Cavagnero’s success has been recognized by top awards from the AIA, SF Chamber of Commerce, California Preservation Foundation, and many of the region’s cultural and civic organizations.… | View more

Cavagnero’s success has been recognized by top awards from the AIA, SF Chamber of Commerce, California Preservation Foundation, and many of the region’s cultural and civic organizations. And he is one of just 16 recipients of the AIA California Council Maybeck Award for lifetime achievement.

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3.29.2017
The new Academic Center has transformed the College of Marin’s Kentfield campus. The design thoughtfully engages three generations of buildings and landscape, to create a new sense… | View more

The new Academic Center has transformed the College of Marin’s Kentfield campus. The design thoughtfully engages three generations of buildings and landscape, to create a new sense of community, and a welcoming gateway to the campus. TLCD Architecture teamed with Mark Cavagnero Associates to create a signature building at the corner of Sir Francis Drake Boulevard and College Avenue, the last of the major projects in the College’s Measure C Bond program.

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2.20.2017
Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW) has unveiled its high-rise glass tower named “555 Howard” for San Francisco developed in collaboration with local architecture firm Mark Cavagnero Associates… | View more

Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW) has unveiled its high-rise glass tower named “555 Howard” for San Francisco developed in collaboration with local architecture firm Mark Cavagnero Associates Architects.
Developed Pacific Eagle and SKS Partners, 555 Howard will be the first U.S. tower of Renzo Piano outside of New York.

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2.16.2017
The first public renderings for Italian architect Renzo Piano’s proposed San Francisco tower show a discreet addition to the skyline with one extravagant touch — a rooftop… | View more

The first public renderings for Italian architect Renzo Piano’s proposed San Francisco tower show a discreet addition to the skyline with one extravagant touch — a rooftop public space 385 feet in the air.
The roof terrace would sit atop 36 floors of hotel and residential space, shaded by trees and framed by a 20-foot-high glass wall. The penthouse floor below would include a restaurant and lounge, but visitors wouldn’t need to buy anything to visit the sky-high perch.

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1.2017
LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, one of the oldest social-services organizations in California, is on the forefront of technology and training for blind and low-vision… | View more

LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, one of the oldest social-services organizations in California, is on the forefront of technology and training for blind and low-vision individuals. The LightHouse needed a new headquarters that would allow them to expand their services and provide an uplifting, positive environment; through the thoughtful integration of acoustics, materials, and technology, the new LightHouse headquarters is designed to function well for blind users while being beautiful for the blind and sighted alike.

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10.1.2016
Expectations are not usually high for the design of a nonprofit social service agency. When the client base and employees are overwhelmingly blind or vision impaired—as they… | View more

Expectations are not usually high for the design of a nonprofit social service agency. When the client base and employees are overwhelmingly blind or vision impaired—as they are at the LightHouse, a 114-year-old private organization that provides rehabilitation, advocacy, and other services—those expectations slip even lower. But, thanks to the efforts of a forward-looking director and a board president who is an architect—both of whom are blind—and a committed design team led by Mark Cavagnero Associates, the new home of the San Francisco LightHouse, which needed to grow its space, stands such preconceptions on their heads.

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8.17.2016
Santa Rosa, CA – The Sonoma County Junior College District is pleased to announce that it has selected the team of TLCD Architecture of Santa Rosa and… | View more

Santa Rosa, CA – The Sonoma County Junior College District is pleased to announce that it has selected the team of TLCD Architecture of Santa Rosa and Mark Cavagnero Associates of San Francisco as the architects for the modernization of one of the College’s oldest buildings, the 77-year-old Burbank Auditorium.  After a multi-step review process the selection committee, composed of faculty, staff, students and a Board member, recommended the TLCD and Cavagnero team to lead the redesign of this Santa Rosa campus landmark. The two firms’ prior collaborations include the award-winning Academic Center building at the College of Marin.

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5.5.2016
The new Academic Center transforms a prominent site on the College of Marin’s Kentfield Campus. The design engages three generations of buildings and landscape on a sloped,… | View more

The new Academic Center transforms a prominent site on the College of Marin’s Kentfield Campus. The design engages three generations of buildings and landscape on a sloped, wooded site and restores the existing historic quad on campus. At the intersection of Sir Francis Drake Boulevard and College Avenue, the 47,000 square foot facility is a welcoming gateway to the surrounding community. The program includes 16 classrooms, two computer labs, 100-seat lecture hall, and faculty and staff offices.

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5.1.2016
Architect, The Terrace at California Academy of Sciences | View more

Architect, The Terrace at California Academy of Sciences

4.5.2016
Loni checks out San Francisco Opera’s new theater space in the War Memorial Veterans Building in the heart of the city.Featuring general director David Gockley, programming director… | View more

Loni checks out San Francisco Opera’s new theater space in the War Memorial Veterans Building in the heart of the city.
Featuring general director David Gockley, programming director Elkhanah Pulitzer, and architectural associate Felicia Dunham.

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3.1.2016
OVER THE PAST 20 years, architect Mark Cavagnero has master-planned the deYoung Museum in Golden Gate Park, designed the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts and… | View more

OVER THE PAST 20 years, architect Mark Cavagnero has master-planned the deYoung Museum in Golden Gate Park, designed the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts and been featured in Architectural Record, California Home and Design and The New York Times. His local projects include the Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center in San Rafael, College of Marin’s Academic Center, Marin Horizon School in Mill Valley and Sava Pool on 19th Avenue in San Francisco.

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2.19.2016
The Monterey Bay Aquarium has submitted a use permit for the $30 million building project at 625 Cannery Row that aims to expand its educational program offerings.… | View more

The Monterey Bay Aquarium has submitted a use permit for the $30 million building project at 625 Cannery Row that aims to expand its educational program offerings. The Center for Ocean Education & Leadership is designed to house the aquarium’s existing educational department. The proposed K-12 ocean education and leadership center will include five learning spaces/labs, a multipurpose room, office space for 35 staff members and a video lab. The target for opening is 2018.

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2.18.2016
Tap, tap, tap. Chris Downey, wearing the suit-and-sneakers uniform of an architect and carrying the cane of a blind person, crosses Howard Street during morning rush hour,… | View more

Tap, tap, tap. Chris Downey, wearing the suit-and-sneakers uniform of an architect and carrying the cane of a blind person, crosses Howard Street during morning rush hour, trailed by an audio engineer with a boom mic. Once on the sidewalk, Downey taps his cane on the concrete, and that sound is also recorded. He heads over to his favorite Mission Street coffee shop, where he taps his cane on the tile floor, and then into the offices of the multidisciplinary design firm Arup, where his cane taps on bamboo flooring. All of these sounds are recorded.

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2.1.2016
The original home of SFMOMA for 60 years, the fourth floor of the War Memorial Veterans Building was once a grand feat of architecture, its 1932 beaux… | View more

The original home of SFMOMA for 60 years, the fourth floor of the War Memorial Veterans Building was once a grand feat of architecture, its 1932 beaux arts design distinguished by high vaulted ceilings, ornate skylights, and expanses of marble. But by 2010, when the San Francisco Opera was on the hunt for a new campus, that same site had fallen into neglect. “It was decrepit,” moans David Gockley, the opera’s general director. Water trickled down the walls and pattered onto plastic bags laid out beneath the skylight. The drywall, once the backdrop for masterpieces by Matisse and Kahlo, was riddled with holes and mildew. Formerly pristine galleries were heaped with a decade of forgotten junk.

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11.17.2015
San Francisco Opera today announced new details of its soon ­to ­be ­completed $21 million renovation of 38,0 square feet in the Veterans Building’s fourth floor and… | View more

San Francisco Opera today announced new details of its soon ­to ­be ­completed $21 million renovation of 38,0 square feet in the Veterans Building’s fourth floor and basement named the Diane B. Wilsey Center for Opera. Adjacent to the War Memorial Opera House, the Wilsey Center for Opera is scheduled to open in late February 2016, and consolidates most of the Company’s operations into a single campus in the vibrant and emerging arts district of San Francisco’s Civic Center. The 1932 Beaux Arts designed Veterans Building recently reopened in September following a 26­month, City financed $156 million seismic retrofit and renovation of the historic Herbst Theatre, Green Rom, meeting rooms, offices and corridors throughout the first three floors.

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11.17.2015
The top floor of the War Memorial Veterans Building, home to a succession of artistic and civic institutions over the years, is about to undergo a striking… | View more

The top floor of the War Memorial Veterans Building, home to a succession of artistic and civic institutions over the years, is about to undergo a striking transformation with the arrival of the San Francisco Opera. The Diane B. Wilsey Center for Opera, slated to open in February, will include a 299-seat performance venue suitable for works of music theater too intimate or rarefied to be feasible in the War Memorial Opera House, as well as exhibition galleries, a new home for the company’s archives, and office space for some 130 Opera employees.

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11.17.2015
The top floor of the War Memorial Veterans Building, home to a succession of artistic and civic institutions over the years, is about to undergo a striking… | View more

The top floor of the War Memorial Veterans Building, home to a succession of artistic and civic institutions over the years, is about to undergo a striking transformation with the arrival of the San Francisco Opera. The Diane B. Wilsey Center for Opera, slated to open in February, will include a 299-seat performance venue suitable for works of music theater too intimate or rarefied to be feasible in the War Memorial Opera House, as well as exhibition galleries, a new home for the company’s archives, and office space for some 130 Opera employees.

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10.6.2015
His affinity and deep passion for architecture began when he was 13, and was only fueled when he entered high school. In his freshman year, Mark Cavagnero,… | View more

His affinity and deep passion for architecture began when he was 13, and was only fueled when he entered high school. In his freshman year, Mark Cavagnero, FAIA, checked out every book from his school library containing the word “architecture” whether it be in the title or the subject. By sophomore year he had read them all.

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10.2.2015
San Francisco Chronicle, Sea Wall 322-1 | View more

San Francisco Chronicle, Sea Wall 322-1

9.28.2015
The notes of change surrounding Van Ness Avenue continue to grow louder. The latest addition is an application from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music to build… | View more

The notes of change surrounding Van Ness Avenue continue to grow louder. The latest addition is an application from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music to build an 11-story tower at 200 Van Ness Avenue, a building that the conservatory purchased back in April along with neighboring Lighthouse for the Blind. 200 Van Ness is currently a 27-unit, rent-controlled building, and its residents will be relocated while the new building is constructed and then given the opportunity to move into the tower alongside students and faculty of the conservatory, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. The tower will bring music to Van Ness with a street-level cafe featuring live performances and performance and rehearsal spaces visible to passersby.

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9.27.2015
The San Francisco Conservatory of Music is composing its next movement on Van Ness Avenue. The music school has filed a preliminary application with the Planning Department… | View more

The San Francisco Conservatory of Music is composing its next movement on Van Ness Avenue. The music school has filed a preliminary application with the Planning Department to build an 11-story tower at 200 Van Ness Ave., a 140-unit building that will house about 300 students and faculty and include a publicly accessible performance space.

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9.23.2015
If you’re feeling glum about the present and future of San Francisco, a three-hour car tour with Mark Cavagnero is just what the doctor ordered. Cavagnero loves… | View more

If you’re feeling glum about the present and future of San Francisco, a three-hour car tour with Mark Cavagnero is just what the doctor ordered. Cavagnero loves everything about the city—its topography, history, cultural institutions, and architecture (some of the finer recent examples of which, like the SFJazz Center, the Public Safety Building, and Sava Pool, he created himself). He’s one of the most sought-after architects in town, with commissions ranging from a new 40,000-square-foot performance space on the top floor of the War Memorial Opera House to a $400 million expansion of Moscone Center. But despite his crowded dance card, he jumped at the opportunity to drive me around town and share his enthusiasms—everything from the hardscrabble charms of Dogpatch to how the symphony and the opera are using transparent ground floors to lure new audiences.

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9.9.2015
Finally, a figurative tip of the hat to San Francisco architect Mark Cavagnero, recipient of this year’s Maybeck Award, the highest individual honor presented by the California… | View more

Finally, a figurative tip of the hat to San Francisco architect Mark Cavagnero, recipient of this year’s Maybeck Award, the highest individual honor presented by the California chapter of the American Institute of Architects.
The Marin resident is known for such projects as SFJazz Center and the updated Oakland Museum of California. “His work embodies historic preservation while at the same time embracing modernism,” one juror commented. And it’s true: Some of his firm’s best work involves the ingenious rebirth of older structures as cultural facilities, including the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts in Richmond.

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9.1.2015
Who had the best 2014? The competition for this year’s Architect 50 was especially fierce, as many firms posted massive gains in revenue. We updated our methodology… | View more

Who had the best 2014? The competition for this year’s Architect 50 was especially fierce, as many firms posted massive gains in revenue. We updated our methodology to include new metrics: percentage of women and minority designers; range and value of employee benefits; rate of employee turnover. Many respected firms missed the cut; some small boutique firms rose through the ranks. The result? A list featuring a diverse array of great practices.

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7.30.2015
“Most of our work is intended to serve the community in one way or another, but our work for San Francisco’s Recreation & Parks Department is especially… | View more

“Most of our work is intended to serve the community in one way or another, but our work for San Francisco’s Recreation & Parks Department is especially rewarding because these projects show what’s possible, even with a modest budget,” says the namesake principal of Mark Cavagnero Associates of his Charlie Sava Pool, which won an AIA San Francisco Excellence in Design Award.

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7.16.2015
A slight air of unreality hangs over the Terrace in San Francisco, as if it were an architectural rendering sprung to life. The thin, crisp lines, the… | View more

A slight air of unreality hangs over the Terrace in San Francisco, as if it were an architectural rendering sprung to life. The thin, crisp lines, the expanses of transparency, the slimmest of slim columns are able to capture the ethereality of the initial sketch. On the grounds of the California Academy of Sciences designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop, the Terrace echoes the elegance of its larger neighbor.

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7.8.2015
We are at a moment where the relationship between law enforcement agencies and communities is under increasing scrutiny. While nationwide news outlets report the tensions and conflicts,… | View more

We are at a moment where the relationship between law enforcement agencies and communities is under increasing scrutiny. While nationwide news outlets report the tensions and conflicts, a new Public Safety Building campus quietly opened in San Francisco’s Mission Bay district this past April, just two blocks from AT&T Park. Jointly designed by HOK and Mark Cavagnero Associates, the project houses multiple law enforcement departments for the city: the police headquarters, a district police station, and a fire station—in one building—along with the Arson Task Force and a community meeting room in a renovated 1928 historic fire house that faces Mission Rock Street.

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7.5.2015
As Salesforce Tower nears completion, the plaza that will accompany it has been shorn of two eye-catching features: a grove of redwood trees and a 40-foot-tall sculpture… | View more

As Salesforce Tower nears completion, the plaza that will accompany it has been shorn of two eye-catching features: a grove of redwood trees and a 40-foot-tall sculpture made from chunks of recycled concrete.
Instead, the half-acre space at Mission and Fremont streets will be handsomely paved but almost entirely open — a change instigated by Salesforce but agreed to by public officials. They welcome the idea of an uncluttered path to the new Transbay Transit Center, which should open next spring on the plaza’s south edge.

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6.28.2015
As the scaffolding comes down, the War Memorial Veterans Building seems to shine, having shed decades of grime. (Or, to please the landlord, “patina.”) But the new… | View more

As the scaffolding comes down, the War Memorial Veterans Building seems to shine, having shed decades of grime. (Or, to please the landlord, “patina.”) But the new look is only skin-deep. Under it are enormous changes, improvements and new facilities vital to The City’s performing arts. The 1932 Beaux-Arts twin to the Opera House next door has undergone a two-year, $128 million seismic retrofitting and major restoration, and is nearing the end of a $1 billion project making all Civic Center buildings as safe as possible. The new building is expected to open in about three months, though an official date has not yet been set.

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5.26.2015
New S.F. police headquarters commands respect, if not love. Some buildings, like some people, are easier to respect than to love. You can admire what they set… | View more

New S.F. police headquarters commands respect, if not love. Some buildings, like some people, are easier to respect than to love. You can admire what they set out to do, even if you don’t want to hug them when they arrive. Which brings us to San Francisco’s new Public Safety Building, an imposing mosaic of concrete and glass in the Mission Bay district. The compound sets two five-story blocks of glass on top of a thick concrete podium that extends around a small brick fire station from 1928. Each block is partly wrapped in a loose-fitting gray zinc screen that leaves them open on the east and west but cloaked on the north and south.

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5.16.2015
Jazz clubs are known for their cozy intimacy, while concert halls convey gravitas. For the first permanent home of SFJAZZ in its 35-year history, organization founder and… | View more

Jazz clubs are known for their cozy intimacy, while concert halls convey gravitas. For the first permanent home of SFJAZZ in its 35-year history, organization founder and executive artistic director Randall Kline sought to bridge that dichotomy. ‘You get wonderful experiences in ‘found’ houses that are not intended to be performance spaces, but we also wanted the focus of a concert hall,’ he says.

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5.4.2015
A new Academic Center at College of Marin is expected to be completed in May, with full occupancy by the college in time for the fall semester.The… | View more

A new Academic Center at College of Marin is expected to be completed in May, with full occupancy by the college in time for the fall semester.
The project, which started in 2013, was designed by TLCD Architecture and Mark Cavagnero Associates. The use of sustainable building practices is concomitant with submission for LEED green-building certification. Scaled back from an original plan for a 77,000-square-foot building, the new center will have approximately 43,000 square feet with 16 general-purpose classrooms, a 100-seat auditorium, and offices for faculty and administration. Cost for the center is about $23 million.

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4.16.2015
San Francisco police officers gathered with some of the city’s highest-ranking public officials today for a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the newly constructed Public Safety Building in the… | View more

San Francisco police officers gathered with some of the city’s highest-ranking public officials today for a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the newly constructed Public Safety Building in the city’s Mission Bay neighborhood. The $243 million Public Safety Building, located on Third Street about two blocks south of AT&T Park, houses the San Francisco Police Department’s operational headquarters.

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3.10.2015
This was my first visit to SFJAZZ, which opened two years ago in the trendy Hayes Valley. The San Francisco Symphony, San Francisco Opera and the new… | View more

This was my first visit to SFJAZZ, which opened two years ago in the trendy Hayes Valley. The San Francisco Symphony, San Francisco Opera and the new Twitter headquarters are neighbors.The steeply raked, arena-like interior of the 700-seat SF JAZZ may lack intimacy, but the amplification by Meyer Sound Laboratories is the most fetching I’ve yet encountered in a space that size. Unamplified chamber music is natural and detailed. This festival was the first to bring in a 60-piece orchestra. The hall is a huge success and booked every night.

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2.1.2015
A master of Architecture from the University of California Berkeley and a Bachelor of Arts, Magna Cum Laude, from Harvard is a promising way for renowned architect,… | View more

A master of Architecture from the University of California Berkeley and a Bachelor of Arts, Magna Cum Laude, from Harvard is a promising way for renowned architect, Mark Cavagnero to begin what would become a prominent career.

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1.6.2015
The cafe is a tiny, taut composition of frame-free glass and poised steel, a diminutive chaser to Renzo Piano’s machine-like academy a few yards away that opened… | View more

The cafe is a tiny, taut composition of frame-free glass and poised steel, a diminutive chaser to Renzo Piano’s machine-like academy a few yards away that opened in 2008. It’s a distillation of International Style modernism rather than a push in new architectural directions, but its very presence sets an example that other local cultural and event institutions would do well to follow.

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12.5.2014
San Franciso Chronicle, Diane B Wilsey Center for Opera | View more

San Franciso Chronicle, Diane B Wilsey Center for Opera

11.1.2014
The SFJAZZ Center is the first building in the country dedicated purely to jazz. San Francisco’s Mark Cavagnero Associates designed the 35,000-square-foot, three-story structure—which encompasses performance, rehearsal,… | View more

The SFJAZZ Center is the first building in the country dedicated purely to jazz. San Francisco’s Mark Cavagnero Associates designed the 35,000-square-foot, three-story structure—which encompasses performance, rehearsal, and office spaces—on a downtown site near the city’s existing opera, symphony, and ballet venues. In addition to the center’s main Robert N. Miner Auditorium, which can host upwards of 700 people in its grandest configuration, a smaller ensemble room on the street level has glass walls that let pedestrians see the musicians inside. Balconies on the top two floors also open the glass-and-concrete building to the neighborhood.

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9.1.2014
Architect, Mark Cavagnero Associates | View more

Architect, Mark Cavagnero Associates

6.27.2014
Plans to expand San Francisco’s Moscone Center’s usable space by 42 percent are moving forward, and backers aim to begin construction on the $500 million project by… | View more

Plans to expand San Francisco’s Moscone Center’s usable space by 42 percent are moving forward, and backers aim to begin construction on the $500 million project by the end of the year. Moscone Center’s convention traffic helped fill more than 900,000 hotel room nights last year and is responsible for 21 percent of the city’s huge tourism industry. The center is seen by planners and the local hospitality leaders as losing business to competing markets that have more space to offer. “Moscone Center is (operating) at full capacity, so this expansion is about growing with our customers,” said John Reyes, executive vice president and chief customer officer at San Francisco Travel Association, which is one of the backers of the project along with the city. Moscone Center has 50 percent less exhibit space per square foot than the 12 convention centers deemed most competitive, such as Las Vegas and Los Angeles, resulting in a loss of nearly $2.1 billion a year to those larger centers, according to backers.

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6.18.2014
Like a pickup easing into a snug parking space without scraping the convertibles on either side, the planned expansion of Moscone Convention Center now looks as if… | View more

Like a pickup easing into a snug parking space without scraping the convertibles on either side, the planned expansion of Moscone Convention Center now looks as if it might fit its setting and not do major harm. In fact, the latest batch of changes to the proposed design should help make the south end of Yerba Buena Gardens feel more like part of the city and less like a zone for special events.

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6.4.2014
Tomorrow the Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on the Environmental Impact Report for the Moscone Center Expansion. As you recall, the project will increase the… | View more

Tomorrow the Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on the Environmental Impact Report for the Moscone Center Expansion. As you recall, the project will increase the convention center’s square footage by almost 20% with new 95′ tall construction on both sides of Howard Street, excavation below the exhibition halls, and two new pedestrian bridges. The first draft of the massive 700-page EIR is all set and ready for public comment, which we’re sure will come in spades. The document calls out potentially significant effects in the areas of transportation and circulation (pedestrian movement on sidewalks) and shadows (on nearby open space). If you have any opinions on the document (not the project itself, that’ll come along at a later hearing), head to the commission hearing on Thursday or submit written comments by June 16.

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6.2.2014
The proposed expansion of Moscone Center would boost the San Francisco convention center’s functional space by 42 percent, add some room to nearby public spaces, improve pedestrian… | View more

The proposed expansion of Moscone Center would boost the San Francisco convention center’s functional space by 42 percent, add some room to nearby public spaces, improve pedestrian access and require that thousands of cubic yards of earth be removed from beneath Howard Street. The details of the $500 million project — which planners and the local hospitality industry see as crucial to keep San Francisco a top destination for trade shows and events that filled more than 900,000 hotel room-nights last year — will be discussed this week at a public hearing.

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5.29.2014
The Mark Cavagnero Associates and HOK-designed Public Safety Building will house the Mission Bay Fire Station and the SFPD Command Center. The $243M facility will be LEED… | View more

The Mark Cavagnero Associates and HOK-designed Public Safety Building will house the Mission Bay Fire Station and the SFPD Command Center. The $243M facility will be LEED Gold-certified.

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4.3.2014
101 acres in Mill Valley that is currently home to the campus of the Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary has been sold to a developer for apartments… | View more

101 acres in Mill Valley that is currently home to the campus of the Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary has been sold to a developer for apartments and a school campus. The land has been used by the seminary since 1959, but they decided to sell in order to build a new campus in Southern California and relocate a secondary campus in the Bay Area. San Rafael company North Coast Land Holdings bought the land, and aim to build 100+ rental units with some for seniors and low-income renters, as well as school campus (no word on tenant yet, but rumors are an extension campus of a Marin private school). Right now the property has a few buildings at the northern end, but is mostly open space – the development will demo the existing structures in favor of new construction designed by Mark Cavagnero (of SFJAZZ Center and Public Safety Building fame), but will still preserve 10 acres near Richardson Bay as open space.

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4.2.2014
One of the largest and most stunning pieces of privately owned real estate in the Bay Area – 101 mostly undeveloped waterfront acres near Tiburon – will… | View more

One of the largest and most stunning pieces of privately owned real estate in the Bay Area – 101 mostly undeveloped waterfront acres near Tiburon – will be sold to a developer who plans to build apartments and a school campus, sources on both sides of the sale said Tuesday.
The hilltop property in the unincorporated Marin County area of Strawberry, overlooking Richardson Bay north of Sausalito, is being sold by a Baptist theological college that has occupied the site since 1959. The buyer is North Coast Land Holdings, a San Rafael company backed by the Fasken family trust. The Faskens are a longtime Marin family whose fortune originated more than a century ago with oil and ranching in Texas.

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3.28.2014
San Francisco may be the only city on the continent that expects a two-block chunk of downtown to flourish as both a major event facility and a… | View more

San Francisco may be the only city on the continent that expects a two-block chunk of downtown to flourish as both a major event facility and a variegated public park. So it’s no surprise that every move to enlarge the Moscone Convention Center comes under fire from defenders of Yerba Buena Gardens, the mix of green spaces draped above the subterranean event halls. This has never been more true than now, as City Hall attempts to squeeze another 300,000 square feet of meeting space along and under the block of Howard Street bounded by Third and Fourth streets. In fact, the two can continue to coexist – but only if the city’s development team grasps the importance of the public spaces conceived nearly 40 years ago, whatever their design flaws might be.

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2.28.2014
San Francisco’s economic recovery has breathed new life into a proposed $240 million relocation and renovation plan for the Ruth Asawa School of the Arts. The San… | View more

San Francisco’s economic recovery has breathed new life into a proposed $240 million relocation and renovation plan for the Ruth Asawa School of the Arts. The San Francisco Unified School District has talked of moving the school, almost since its 1982 opening, from Portola Drive to the Civic Center, the heart of the city’s arts and cultural institutions. But officials quailed at the high cost of renovating the historic 135 Van Ness block of buildings from a district administration building to an arts high school. Now it looks like the project might actually happen.

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2.4.2014
Last month, an underwhelming preliminary rendering of Moscone Center’s $500 million expansion surfaced on the San Francisco Department of Public Works’ Facebook page. Today, brand new renderings… | View more

Last month, an underwhelming preliminary rendering of Moscone Center’s $500 million expansion surfaced on the San Francisco Department of Public Works’ Facebook page. Today, brand new renderings of the project showcase a far more glamorous building than the one previously depicted. A plethora of newly released images of the glassy Skidmore, Owings & Merrill-designed expansion give architecture buffs a much clearer idea of what’s to come. Besides massively expanding the center’s square footage, the project will also beautify and enlarge the pedestrian bridge linking Yerba Buena Gardens to the other side of Howard street. The project website still advertises a 2017 opening, which seems feasible assuming the approvals process goes smoothly.

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1.1.2014
San Francisco Business Times, Mark Cavagnero Associates | View more

San Francisco Business Times, Mark Cavagnero Associates

1.1.2014
Architectural Record, SFJAZZ | View more

Architectural Record, SFJAZZ

12.31.2013
Our closeout of the year continues as we survey friends, industry types, bloggers, and readers to get a read on the highlights and lowlights of the last… | View more

Our closeout of the year continues as we survey friends, industry types, bloggers, and readers to get a read on the highlights and lowlights of the last year of building and designing in San Francisco. We’ve already covered Neighborhood Breakups, Biggest Building Trends, Favorite Developments, 2013 in Three Words, and Building Trends You’re Over. Now let’s shift gears to Real Estate and Development Predictions for the coming year. Readers, please add your thoughts to the comments.

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12.18.2013
With the start of construction now only a year out, Moscone Center’s planned $500 million expansion is coming into focus. In a first look, the San Francisco… | View more

With the start of construction now only a year out, Moscone Center’s planned $500 million expansion is coming into focus. In a first look, the San Francisco Department of Public works has released early concept drawings of the expansion plans from the project’s lead architect Skidmore, Owings and Merrill.

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12.13.2013
Last February, word got out that $500M had been secured to fund a massive expansion of Moscone Convention Center, and now the first signs of progress have… | View more

Last February, word got out that $500M had been secured to fund a massive expansion of Moscone Convention Center, and now the first signs of progress have appeared online. A new preliminary rendering of the project, shown above, was published on the department of Public Works’ Facebook page, accompanied by a call for an experienced project manager to lead “planning, design and construction” of the expansion. There’s also an official website dedicated to the project, which cites Skidmore, Owings and Merrill as the architects. On top adding over 200,000 square feet of rentable exhibition space to the current center, plans include improving conditions for pedestrians along Howard and enhancing connections between the building and the neighborhood. Construction is set to commence in 2015, with opening anticipated to occur in late 2017.

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11.1.2013
Lighting and Sound America, SFJAZZ | View more

Lighting and Sound America, SFJAZZ

10.17.2013
Unbowed, the district has brought on architect Mark Cavagnero, who designed the new SFJazz Center across the street, not only to design the school, but also to… | View more

Unbowed, the district has brought on architect Mark Cavagnero, who designed the new SFJazz Center across the street, not only to design the school, but also to help with fundraising. The $15 million in voter-approved funds remains available.
“In order to make this project happen,” Goldin said, “we’re going to need a combination of our own general obligation bond money and a fairly significant fundraising effort from private donors who understand that investing in the School of the Arts is investing to make sure all of our city art institutions last for years to come.”

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10.1.2013
Auditoria, SFJAZZ | View more

Auditoria, SFJAZZ

9.1.2013
Mark Cavagnero Associates placed in the top 50 of architects in The Architect 50 Rankings. | View more

Mark Cavagnero Associates placed in the top 50 of architects in The Architect 50 Rankings.

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8.16.2013
SFJazz has opened its space up for booking “as often as possible,” Allen said. As a result, space has booked up fast. Nearly 80 percent of its… | View more

SFJazz has opened its space up for booking “as often as possible,” Allen said. As a result, space has booked up fast. Nearly 80 percent of its available event days are already taken through the end of the year for both non-profit and corporate clients, according to Allen, and “we’re turning folks away.” Upcoming events include the TED Women’s conference and a KPMG employee meeting.

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6.25.2013
SFJAZZ, founded in 1983 by musician and entrepreneur Randall Kline, is one of the world’s most comprehensive and innovative jazz organizations. In the decade prior to opening… | View more

SFJAZZ, founded in 1983 by musician and entrepreneur Randall Kline, is one of the world’s most comprehensive and innovative jazz organizations. In the decade prior to opening the Center, SFJAZZ presented year-round programming for nearly 100 concerts annually, reaching an audience of 100,000 patrons, in venues throughout San Francisco. An anonymous $25-million gift—the largest in history given to a jazz organization—catalyzed an ambitious $63-million capital campaign to fund the creation of the SFJAZZ Center and bolster the organization’s endowment and programming.

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6.23.2013
The California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, perhaps the Bay Area’s most popular building of the past decade, may sprout a tiny addition – a… | View more

The California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, perhaps the Bay Area’s most popular building of the past decade, may sprout a tiny addition – a 1,450-square-foot dining pavilion. And while it won’t have an undulating green roof, or a design by fabled Academy architect Renzo Piano, it’s exactly what this high-profile nook of San Francisco needs.

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6.15.2013
plusMOOD, SFJAZZ | View more

plusMOOD, SFJAZZ

5.16.2013
As a latecomer to San Francisco’s performing-arts district, SFJAZZ, a 30-year-old concert series, had to figure out how to fit into the Hayes Valley neighborhood. Working against… | View more

As a latecomer to San Francisco’s performing-arts district, SFJAZZ, a 30-year-old concert series, had to figure out how to fit into the Hayes Valley neighborhood. Working against the backdrop of the Beaux Arts’styled San Francisco Conservatory of Music and War Memorial Opera House, Mark Cavagnero Associates set out to design a modern building for the jazz center that would look as if it had always been there. ‘We wanted to lock it into the street,’ says principal Mark Cavagnero, ‘and to have the sidewalk and the lobby and the caf’ all open up into the public realm.’ Pointing out the center’s diaphanous glass facade, he adds, ‘There’s no opaque wall between you and the SFJAZZ Center. It’s as transparent as we can make it.’

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4.25.2013
The new $243 million San Francisco Public Safety Building in the Mission Bay neighborhood is helping fill the gap along Third Street between Dogpatch and the Giants… | View more

The new $243 million San Francisco Public Safety Building in the Mission Bay neighborhood is helping fill the gap along Third Street between Dogpatch and the Giants ballpark. The new Hok/Mark Cavagnero Associates designed building, across China Basin Street from the popular Madrone development, will provide a new 264,000 sq. ft. home for the SFPD Command Center as well as a new Mission Bay fire station. The existing, historic Fire Station #30 will be integrated with the new building to become a 25,000 sq. ft. community meeting room.

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3.28.2013
Which architecture firms rule in the Bay Area? We ranked the top 50 companies in the region by local design revenue. | View more

Which architecture firms rule in the Bay Area? We ranked the top 50 companies in the region by local design revenue.

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3.22.2013
The SFJAZZ Center is the first stand-alone concert hall dedicated exclusively to jazz in the United States — and the project’s ambitious design reflects its lofty goal… | View more

The SFJAZZ Center is the first stand-alone concert hall dedicated exclusively to jazz in the United States — and the project’s ambitious design reflects its lofty goal of bringing jazz to a broader audience. The 35,000-square-foot, glass-plated structure at 205 Franklin St. in Hayes Valley was designed by Mark Cavagnero of Mark Cavagnero Associates and built by contractor Hathaway Dinwiddie. It joins other performance venues in the area, such as the San Francisco Opera House and the Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall.

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3.1.2013
Conde Nast Traveler Russia Edition, SFJAZZ | View more

Conde Nast Traveler Russia Edition, SFJAZZ

3.1.2013
California Style Magazine, SFJAZZ | View more

California Style Magazine, SFJAZZ

2.22.2013
The Atlantic Cities, SFJAZZ | View more

The Atlantic Cities, SFJAZZ

2.15.2013
Unlike the other newcomers, SFJazz Center is intensely urban. Traffic races by the $64 million center on two sides. The restaurant zone of Hayes Valley begins across… | View more

Unlike the other newcomers, SFJazz Center is intensely urban. Traffic races by the $64 million center on two sides. The restaurant zone of Hayes Valley begins across an alley to the north. The architecture is urban as well, perhaps too much so, and during the day the three-story shell with vertical bars of clear and translucent glass looks a lot like nearby modern office buildings. It’s at night that the ethereal cool of the design by Mark Cavagnero Associates comes into focus. The translucent bars float in the darkness like abstract piano keys, and people moving through the glassed-in lobbies add a shadowy depth.

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2.4.2013
SFJazz, the San Francisco-based organization supporting jazz music in the Bay Area, has opened its new $65 million home in the Civic Center performing arts district. The… | View more

SFJazz, the San Francisco-based organization supporting jazz music in the Bay Area, has opened its new $65 million home in the Civic Center performing arts district. The three-story, 35,000-square-foot venue was designed by local architects Mark Cavagnero Associates—winner of the 2012 AIA California Council Firm of the Year award. The center’s main auditorium features flexible seating arrangements that can increase its capacity from 350 to 700. In addition to the primary stage, the LEED Certified SFJazz Center has a smaller, 80-seat multi-purpose ensemble room, as well as ground-level public amenities that include a café, a box office, and a small retail shop. Ample glazing allows daylight into the public spaces, and allows for a visual connection to the building’s surroundings. Three jazz-centric murals were commissioned and installed in the green room and upstairs lobby of the center.

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2.2.2013
The Register Citizen, SFJAZZ | View more

The Register Citizen, SFJAZZ

2.2013
Escape Magazine, SFJAZZ | View more

Escape Magazine, SFJAZZ

1.29.2013
Wall Street Journal, SFJAZZ | View more

Wall Street Journal, SFJAZZ

1.26.2013
SAN FRANCISCO — Hours before the opening-night concert for the SFJazz Center here on Wednesday, Randall Kline stood on the floor of the Robert N. Miner Auditorium… | View more

SAN FRANCISCO — Hours before the opening-night concert for the SFJazz Center here on Wednesday, Randall Kline stood on the floor of the Robert N. Miner Auditorium and briefly slipped into reverie. Onstage, a few feet away, the pianist McCoy Tyner and the vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson were testing out acoustics and rekindling a partnership; others scurried about, giving the room an expectant hum.

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1.26.2013
SAN FRANCISCO — Franklin Street skirts the edge of a trendy neighborhood known as Hayes Valley, where Herman Leonard’s oversize photographs of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington and… | View more

SAN FRANCISCO — Franklin Street skirts the edge of a trendy neighborhood known as Hayes Valley, where Herman Leonard’s oversize photographs of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington and Art Blakey look down from the windows of an old brick building onto jazz’s newest temple.

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1.25.2013
SFJAZZ, the San Francisco-based organization supporting jazz music in the Bay Area, has found a new $65 million home in the Civic Center performing arts district. The… | View more

SFJAZZ, the San Francisco-based organization supporting jazz music in the Bay Area, has found a new $65 million home in the Civic Center performing arts district. The three-story, 35,000-square-foot venue, designed by local architects Mark Cavagnero Associates—winner of the 2011 AIA California Firm of the Year award—features flexible seating arrangements in its main auditorium that allow its capacity to expand from 350 to 700. In addition to the primary stage, the LEED Certified SFJAZZ Center has a smaller, 80-seat multi-purpose ensemble room, as well as ground level public amenities that include a café, a box office, and a small retail shop. Ample glazing on the exterior provides daylighting to the public spaces, as well as a visual connection to its surroundings, in the first stand-alone venue specifically designed for jazz performances.

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1.24.2013
In the last few years, San Francisco has seen an influx of new architecture to house its cultural institutions. The new SFJAZZ center designed by award-winning firm… | View more

In the last few years, San Francisco has seen an influx of new architecture to house its cultural institutions. The new SFJAZZ center designed by award-winning firm Mark Cavagnero Associates, which formally opened on January 21, joins their ranks as an admirable addition to the city’s urban fabric. The building is modern architecture at its best: in tune with its surroundings, functionality (acoustics, in this case) held paramount in its design, and intended for the public (rather than a rarefied few) to enjoy.

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1.24.2013
Well, that didn’t take long. San Francisco’s highly anticipated SFJAZZ Center opened for business Wednesday night (Jan. 23) with a gala performance. Within minutes the music felt… | View more

Well, that didn’t take long. San Francisco’s highly anticipated SFJAZZ Center opened for business Wednesday night (Jan. 23) with a gala performance. Within minutes the music felt right at home in the sumptuous new $64 million building in the bustling Hayes Valley neighborhood, a hotbed of culture and cuisine.

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1.24.2013
SAN FRANCISCO — “Congratulations,” Bill Cosby told a roomful of jazz patrons on Wednesday, near the outset of the opening-night concert at the SFJazz Center here. “This… | View more

SAN FRANCISCO — “Congratulations,” Bill Cosby told a roomful of jazz patrons on Wednesday, near the outset of the opening-night concert at the SFJazz Center here. “This is your place, you know.”

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1.24.2013
Los Angeles Times, SFJAZZ | View more

Los Angeles Times, SFJAZZ

1.24.2013
Jazz aficionados have made pilgrimages from around the world for performances at SFJAZZ, the 30-year-old San Francisco-based music company. Until this week, however, they never knew quite… | View more

Jazz aficionados have made pilgrimages from around the world for performances at SFJAZZ, the 30-year-old San Francisco-based music company. Until this week, however, they never knew quite where they’d find it as it staged shows at a variety of venues.

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1.23.2013
Some architects aim to dazzle with flash, with eye-popping forms or cloud-piercing heights. As Mark Cavagnero walked through the new $64 million home his firm designed for… | View more

Some architects aim to dazzle with flash, with eye-popping forms or cloud-piercing heights. As Mark Cavagnero walked through the new $64 million home his firm designed for SFJazz, he paused on the lobby staircase to explain how the titanium steel posts that support the handrails relate to both the railings inside the auditorium and the bicycle racks outside by the street. “We took the idea of these double plates and tried to see how far we could trace it through,” Cavagnero said. “I like that aspect of the work, thinking about all the implications of what these things are and how they come together.”

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1.23.2013
The SFJAZZ center was designed to be open and inviting — you’ll even be able to glimpse the main stage from the street. Randall Kline founded SFJAZZ… | View more

The SFJAZZ center was designed to be open and inviting — you’ll even be able to glimpse the main stage from the street. Randall Kline founded SFJAZZ 30 years ago, so he’s had lots of time to consider how the perfect space for the organization would look. This week, with SFJAZZ opening the first standalone center for jazz on the West Coast, Kline’s vision has become a reality that anyone can see into.

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1.22.2013
At a preview of the SFJAZZ Center, the $53 million low-rise building in the heart of Hayes Valley was called a temple “to the national art form,”… | View more

At a preview of the SFJAZZ Center, the $53 million low-rise building in the heart of Hayes Valley was called a temple “to the national art form,” which — bandleader/percussionist John Santos added, “is generally disrespected in this country more than anywhere else.” Santos has been intimately involved with SFJAZZ, ever since participating in the organization’s first concert 30 years ago.

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1.21.2013
The Sacramento Bee, SFJAZZ | View more

The Sacramento Bee, SFJAZZ

1.21.2013
With musicians in mind, Mark Cavagnero designs the first concert hall in the United States purpose-built for jazz performances. When Chick Corea, Esperanza Spalding, and other greats… | View more

With musicians in mind, Mark Cavagnero designs the first concert hall in the United States purpose-built for jazz performances. When Chick Corea, Esperanza Spalding, and other greats take the stage at SFJAZZ Center’s opening concert on Wednesday—in a night of performances emceed by Bill Cosby—they will not only inaugurate San Francisco’s newest concert venue, but they will also break in the first standalone jazz hall in the United States. The building, which opens officially today, joins the city’s opera, ballet, and symphony in the Civic Center performing arts district, and it gives the 30-year-old SFJAZZ organization its first permanent home.

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1.21.2013
The world’s first freestanding building dedicated entirely to jazz, San Francisco’s just-opened SFJAZZ Center was built to enhance the strains of saxophonists, trumpeters, and more—Tony Bennett and… | View more

The world’s first freestanding building dedicated entirely to jazz, San Francisco’s just-opened SFJAZZ Center was built to enhance the strains of saxophonists, trumpeters, and more—Tony Bennett and Béla Fleck are scheduled to perform in the spring season—with high-tech acoustics, a streamlined concert hall, and strategically placed seats. In Hayes Valley, architect Mark Cavagnero’s 36,000-square-foot three-story modern space includes these notable aspects…

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1.17.2013
SFJAZZ unveiled its just-finished $64 million concert hall and educational center in Hayes Valley on Wednesday. The new 700-seat venue — dubbed the Robert N. Miner Auditorium… | View more

SFJAZZ unveiled its just-finished $64 million concert hall and educational center in Hayes Valley on Wednesday. The new 700-seat venue — dubbed the Robert N. Miner Auditorium — is considered the first standalone performance space in the country dedicated specifically to jazz.

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1.15.2013
San Francisco Bay Guardian, SFJAZZ | View more

San Francisco Bay Guardian, SFJAZZ

1.6.2013
This is one of my favorite rooms, said SFJAZZ founder and Executive Artistic Director Randall Kline, smiling as he stepped over exposed pipes and dusty planks in… | View more

This is one of my favorite rooms, said SFJAZZ founder and Executive Artistic Director Randall Kline, smiling as he stepped over exposed pipes and dusty planks in the SFJAZZ Center. “Then again, they’re all my favorite rooms,” he added. You’ll forgive Kline for sounding a bit excited. This month, construction on the $63-million SFJAZZ Center will finish with a grand opening scheduled for Jan.21, Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Two days later, a roster of opening-night performers that includes McCoy Tyner, Joshua Redman, Chick Corea and Esperanza Spalding (with Bill Cosby as master of ceremonies) will christen the first SFJAZZ season in the building (though SFJAZZ has been presenting concerts in and around San Francisco for 30 years).

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1.1.2013
OVER THE PAST 12 YEARS, Mark Cavagnero has designed 20 high-profile buildings in the Bay Area and won scores of awards. But as I tail him around… | View more

OVER THE PAST 12 YEARS, Mark Cavagnero has designed 20 high-profile buildings in the Bay Area and won scores of awards. But as I tail him around the sawdust-covered site of his latest baby—the SFJazz Center in Hayes Valley, opening January 21st—it feels like I’m chasing after a kid showing off his new fort. Clad in his favored ensemble of layered knits and a professorial blazer, topped with a hard hat and a neon-orange construction vest, the ruggedly handsome architect ducks steel beams and vaults up plywood ramps, giddy with excitement as he chats with contractors, strokes finishes, and snaps iPhone pics. Painters have arrived; seats are being installed this week; ceramic mural tiles are en route—and Cavagnero thinks it’s all “really cool.”

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12.29.2012
Just months after completion of a $56 million upgrade of the Moscone Convention Center, the city is moving ahead with plans for a half-billion-dollar expansion of the… | View more

Just months after completion of a $56 million upgrade of the Moscone Convention Center, the city is moving ahead with plans for a half-billion-dollar expansion of the facility, with an opening date of 2018. It’s a matter of staying competitive in the dog-eat-dog struggle to bring conventions and their hundreds of thousands of big-spending vendors and attendees into the city, said John Noguchi, director of convention facilities for the city. “This is a huge deal,” he said. “There’s a lot of competition for convention business throughout the country and it’s important that we expand to keep our share of it.”

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12.14.2012
The building is an important building beloved in the community of Oakland, and within the larger San Francisco Bay Area. Changing and adding onto it brought a… | View more

The building is an important building beloved in the community of Oakland, and within the larger San Francisco Bay Area. Changing and adding onto it brought a level of responsibility that we took very seriously. At the same time, numerous programmatic, code, engineering, circulation, wayfinding, exhibition and functional aspects of the museum needed to be changed in significant ways. At a minimum, the museum wanted additional enclosed exhibition space, a clear strong entry on Oak Street and enclosures over the exterior stairways, all of which required dramatic changes to the building. Making significant changes yet retaining the original feel of a building, which is at once a museum and a garden, was the single largest challenge.

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11.4.2012
A lot of “musts” and “buts” are inherent in such a complex undertaking. Anyone making any decision on the way to converting a high-flying dream of a… | View more

A lot of “musts” and “buts” are inherent in such a complex undertaking. Anyone making any decision on the way to converting a high-flying dream of a cultural center into a bricks-and-mortar reality must climb a mountain of rules and warnings. But Kline and trustee Robert Mailer Anderson aren’t into “musts” and “buts.” Although immersed in a myriad of details, Kline and Anderson (who’s been a driving force on the project), seem determined to keep focused on the big picture, to create a concert hall and a community clubhouse, and to toss every arts center cliché – get outta here, you tented gala! – right out one of the generous-size windows of their new building.

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10.22.2012
Randall Kline, founder and executive director of SFJAZZ, has led the effort to fund and build one of the few dedicated jazz performance spaces in decades. During… | View more

Randall Kline, founder and executive director of SFJAZZ, has led the effort to fund and build one of the few dedicated jazz performance spaces in decades. During a recent construction tour, it was obvious that this facility will rival New York’s Jazz at Lincoln Center, both in quality of the space and in the musicians that it will attract. Tapping Mark Cavagnero Associates, SFJAZZ selected one of the Bay Area’s most gifted architects to design the Center. Cavagnero’s recent cultural buildings include the renovation of the Oakland Museum and the ODC Dance Theater’s permanent home in the Mission district.

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9.17.2012
The Jack & Peggy Baskin Center for Philanthropy is a dynamic LEED Gold-certified hub for philanthropists in Santa Cruz County, California. The 10,000 square-foot office building is… | View more

The Jack & Peggy Baskin Center for Philanthropy is a dynamic LEED Gold-certified hub for philanthropists in Santa Cruz County, California. The 10,000 square-foot office building is the new home for the Community Foundation, which helps people invest in causes that they care about by providing aid to nonprofits and donors.

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9.16.2012
After holding its performances in an improvised mix of venues around the city for the past three decades, SFJAZZ finally has a place to park its piano.… | View more

After holding its performances in an improvised mix of venues around the city for the past three decades, SFJAZZ finally has a place to park its piano. When it opens on January 21, 2013, the new 35,000-square-foot SFJAZZ Center will be the first standalone jazz performance hall in the U.S., and just a drumstick’s throw from the San Francisco Ballet and the San Francisco Opera in the city’s performing arts district. The main public space, the second-floor lobby, will offer sweeping views of the city from behind an expansive glass façade. We recently toured the facility with architect Mark Cavagnero.

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9.14.2012
With the new SFJazz Center nearing completion, Randall Kline — founder and executive/artistic director of SFJazz — talked about his organization’s great leap forward. | View more

With the new SFJazz Center nearing completion, Randall Kline — founder and executive/artistic director of SFJazz — talked about his organization’s great leap forward.

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9.13.2012
SFJazz, the Bay Area jazz institution which has for nearly 30 years presented concerts and festivals in rented spaces, announced on Thursday the lineup for a series… | View more

SFJazz, the Bay Area jazz institution which has for nearly 30 years presented concerts and festivals in rented spaces, announced on Thursday the lineup for a series of opening concerts and a wide-ranging full-season schedule in its new permanent space — with concerts by local as well as international artists and educational programming.

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9.13.2012
SFJazz has booked a raft of blockbuster shows – with stars like Chick Corea, Esperanza Spalding and Joshua Redman, and multi-night programs by Bill Frisell, Brad Mehldau… | View more

SFJazz has booked a raft of blockbuster shows – with stars like Chick Corea, Esperanza Spalding and Joshua Redman, and multi-night programs by Bill Frisell, Brad Mehldau and Zakir Hussain – to inaugurate the SFJazz Center, a 35,000-square-foot building at Fell and Franklin streets that opens Jan. 21, Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Designed by San Francisco architect Mark Cavagnero, with acoustician Sam Berkow and San Francisco theater designer Len Auerbach, the light-filled center, which the public can tour for free after the ribbon cutting, is the first stand-alone building in America designed for jazz. It’s built around a steeply raked amphitheater than can seat between 350 and 700 patrons and was shaped with input from some of the musicians playing for the Jan. 23 opening-concert bash, among them Redman and fellow saxophonist Joe Lovano.

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8.26.2012
Randall Kline stood in the unfinished 700-seat amphitheater of the new SFJazz Center at Fell and Franklin streets recently, awash in the hum and buzz of construction… | View more

Randall Kline stood in the unfinished 700-seat amphitheater of the new SFJazz Center at Fell and Franklin streets recently, awash in the hum and buzz of construction cranes and acetylene torches. He marveled at the pace and efficiency of the Hathaway Dinwiddie crew building the country’s first stand-alone structure dedicated to and designed for jazz.

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8.1.2012
A university town with a hippie vibe, Santa Cruz, California, has long been artist-friendly. But it has also faced a need for affordable live-work accommodations for creatives… | View more

A university town with a hippie vibe, Santa Cruz, California, has long been artist-friendly. But it has also faced a need for affordable live-work accommodations for creatives who have been displaced by luxury residences and increased student enrollment. To reinvigorate the arts scene, the city’s economic development agency embarked on a heroic adaptive-reuse endeavor, purchasing an 1861 tannery complex, partnering with the arts-focused real-estate developer Artspace, and bringing in Mark Cavagnero Associates, an architecture firm that’s built a portfolio weighty with projects in the arts sector. Here, Mark Cavagnero was charged with converting two of the five buildings on the 8-acre riverfront site into the Tannery Arts Center.

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6.29.2012
A decade after its last major expansion, San Francisco’s Moscone Convention Center is planning to enlarge its space by adding 250,000 to 400,000 square feet to its… | View more

A decade after its last major expansion, San Francisco’s Moscone Convention Center is planning to enlarge its space by adding 250,000 to 400,000 square feet to its current 1 million square feet. Helming the potential additions and reconfigurations is the joint team of SOM and Mark Cavagnero Associates. They beat out a slew of contenders, including AECOM, Gensler, and HOK, who designed the original center in 1981.

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6.22.2012
Architects Skidmore Owings & Merrill and Mark Cavagnero Associates have been picked to design the expansion of San Francisco’s Moscone Center, an estimated $500 million project tourism… | View more

Architects Skidmore Owings & Merrill and Mark Cavagnero Associates have been picked to design the expansion of San Francisco’s Moscone Center, an estimated $500 million project tourism boosters hope will allow the city to remain competitive in attracting and retaining conventions. SOM and Cavagnero beat out a competitive group of bidders that included HOK, Gensler and AECOM. Jeffrey Birdwell of Sares Regis Group, which is overseeing the architectural design and engineering of an expansion, said SOM and Cavagnero “rose to the top of the pack” because of both experience and “conceptual ideas that were intriguing.”

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6.22.2012
In Hayes Valley, the SF Jazz Center is gearing up to be the venue of choice for San Francisco jazz musicians. Since its inception in 1983, SFJAZZ… | View more

In Hayes Valley, the SF Jazz Center is gearing up to be the venue of choice for San Francisco jazz musicians. Since its inception in 1983, SFJAZZ has organized jazz concerts, events and classes in venues across the Bay Area. With the creation of the 35,000-square-foot SFJAZZ Center, the organization will consolidate its jazz programs under one roof, designed by architect Mark Cavagnero.

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5.1.2012
Azure Magazine, Community Foundation Santa Cruz County | View more

Azure Magazine, Community Foundation Santa Cruz County

4.13.2012
AIArchitect, Mark Cavagnero Associates | View more

AIArchitect, Mark Cavagnero Associates

3.16.2012
In the early 1920s, Adolph and Elisabeth Winters, recent German ‘migr’s, hired a little-known San Francisco architect, Albert W. Cornelius, to design a center for ballroom dancing,… | View more

In the early 1920s, Adolph and Elisabeth Winters, recent German ‘migr’s, hired a little-known San Francisco architect, Albert W. Cornelius, to design a center for ballroom dancing, concerts, and the occasional boxing match, in downtown Richmond, California. The Beaux-Arts structure became known as the Winters Building and, over the years, housed retail space and a bank. But by 1973, when the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts took up residence in part of the building, much of it had fallen into disrepair: Its roofs leaked, its ceilings were low, and the first level’s stalwart concrete face gave it the look of a bunker. Add to that a town that had lost much of its population after World War II and was plagued by drug-related crime, and the setting was grim. Enter Jordan Simmons, who, since 1985, has been the center’s artistic director and its effusive champion. In 2005, Simmons commissioned Mark Cavagnero Associates Architects, of San Francisco, to complete an $8.3 million rehabilitation of the old Winters Building, a 16,000-square-foot, reinforced-concrete-and-heavy-timber structure

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3.1.2012
Architectual Record, UC Berkeley Durant Hall | View more

Architectual Record, UC Berkeley Durant Hall

2.6.2012
More than just a small arts facility owned by the city, the center garnered major museum cred after introducing traveling shows in the ’90s, one of which… | View more

More than just a small arts facility owned by the city, the center garnered major museum cred after introducing traveling shows in the ’90s, one of which landed at the Smithsonian. A makeover of the interiors (including new children’s classrooms and expanded galleries) and a new garden by SWA landscape architects will be more in line with the center’s newfound status.

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1.30.2012
San Francisco Chronicle, UC Berkeley Durant Hall | View more

San Francisco Chronicle, UC Berkeley Durant Hall

1.30.2012
San Francisco Chronicle, East Bay Center for the Performing Arts | View more

San Francisco Chronicle, East Bay Center for the Performing Arts

12.13.2011
The Community Foundation Santa Cruz County in Aptos, Calif., has a new permanent home in a $9.3 million center designed by San Francisco–based Mark Cavagnero Associates. The… | View more

The Community Foundation Santa Cruz County in Aptos, Calif., has a new permanent home in a $9.3 million center designed by San Francisco–based Mark Cavagnero Associates. The client wanted the 10,000-square-foot building—which houses offices, conference rooms, a resource library, and large community meeting room—to be both flexible and to embody the group’s commitment to sustainable design.

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11.15.2011
When architect John Galen Howard mapped a Beaux-Arts plan for the University of California, Berkeley campus in the early 20th century, one of the first buildings erected… | View more

When architect John Galen Howard mapped a Beaux-Arts plan for the University of California, Berkeley campus in the early 20th century, one of the first buildings erected in its spirit was Durant Hall—a two-story steel-framed structure completed in 1911 and wrapped in granite along classical lines. Designed by Howard for the law school, and later home to the university’s East Asian Library, the 18,000-square-foot box has been restored to house the administrative offices of the College of Letters and Sciences, which had been scattered among several locations. The building also has been brought discreetly into the 21st century, its formal aura softened by an emphasis on sustainability and a new entry plaza that invites students to linger.

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9.28.2011
Richmond Confidential, UC Berkeley Durant Hall | View more

Richmond Confidential, UC Berkeley Durant Hall

9.28.2011
Contra Costa Times, UC Berkeley Durant Hall | View more

Contra Costa Times, UC Berkeley Durant Hall

9.28.2011
Through the floor-to-ceiling windows of the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts, Monday night passersby on Macdonald Avenue peer in curiously at a whirl of dance.… | View more

Through the floor-to-ceiling windows of the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts, Monday night passersby on Macdonald Avenue peer in curiously at a whirl of dance. Fingers snap. Feet slide. Hands swoosh a horsehair prop through the air, slapping the knees at intervals. The bright pastels of Victoria Secret sweatpants flash across the room in a blur of pink, yellow and turquoise. The dancers chant a call and response in a West African language: “Wadapo!” Drums pound in a flurry of beats, a cowbell keeping the rhythm. The Youth West African Dance class is one of many in the first official week of classes at the newly reopened East Bay Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Richmond. And even on a Monday, the place is buzzing with students.

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9.28.2011
Contra Costa Times, East Bay Center for the Performing Arts | View more

Contra Costa Times, East Bay Center for the Performing Arts

9.9.2011
Contractor Charles Pankow Builders has broken ground on the $243 million public safety building in San Francisco’s Mission Bay. Designed by HOK and Mark Cavagnero Associates, the… | View more

Contractor Charles Pankow Builders has broken ground on the $243 million public safety building in San Francisco’s Mission Bay. Designed by HOK and Mark Cavagnero Associates, the building is scheduled to open in 2014.The 300,000-square-foot LEED gold structure includes a 110,000-square-foot police headquarters, a 20,000-square-foot Southern District police station, a 17,000-square-foot Mission Bay fire house, 25,000 square feet of shared community space, and a 128,000-square-foot parking structure. Hard construction costs are $164 million. The project was paid for by the Earthquake Safety and Emergency Response Bond approved by San Francisco voters in 2010.

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8.9.2011
San Francisco Chronicle, UC Berkeley Durant Hall | View more

San Francisco Chronicle, UC Berkeley Durant Hall

8.9.2011
Bre Smith was practicing pliés at the ballet barre the other morning at the renovated East Bay Center for the Performing Arts in the Iron Triangle, Richmond’s… | View more

Bre Smith was practicing pliés at the ballet barre the other morning at the renovated East Bay Center for the Performing Arts in the Iron Triangle, Richmond’s roughest neighborhood. An aspiring choreographer and actress who lives in the Triangle, she’d just finished a hip-hop dance class in the glowing new ground-floor performance space that’s fully visible from the street. It’s one of two new theaters designed by architect Mark Cavagnero as part of a $16 million project that has transformed the center’s tired Beaux Arts building and restored its historic facade. Built in 1924 to house a dance hall, flower and music shops, the Winters Building was in sorry shape and ill suited to the needs of the bustling community arts center.

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5.6.2011
SFJazz broke ground Friday for the SFJazz Center, a luminous 35,000-square-foot structure that will rise at Fell and Franklin streets in vibrant Hayes Valley and provide a… | View more

SFJazz broke ground Friday for the SFJazz Center, a luminous 35,000-square-foot structure that will rise at Fell and Franklin streets in vibrant Hayes Valley and provide a permanent home for the West Coast’s premier jazz-presenting organization. Located a block from Davies Symphony Hall in the city’s performing arts corridor, it will be the country’s first major stand-alone facility built specifically for jazz.

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3.25.2011
The renovation and expansion of the ODC Theater, a Mission district dance collective, has revitalized an entire community of performers.The ODC Theater and its Dance Commons a… | View more

The renovation and expansion of the ODC Theater, a Mission district dance collective, has revitalized an entire community of performers.
The ODC Theater and its Dance Commons a few doors away have seen many changes since its purchase by the nonprofit dance collective in 1979. The newest addition added 3,000 square feet of studio space and a cafe, and renovated the now 171-seat theater. The theater was originally a box factory built in 1909 and the dance commons was a two-story building that was turned into a three-story addition.

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3.25.2011
Museum director Lori Fogarty saw a once-in-a-generation opportunity for the Oakland Museum of California to reinvent itself. OMCA started modest remodeling plans in 1999, but Fogarty’s new… | View more

Museum director Lori Fogarty saw a once-in-a-generation opportunity for the Oakland Museum of California to reinvent itself. OMCA started modest remodeling plans in 1999, but Fogarty’s new vision took an exciting turn in 2006 to what has become a $62 million multi-phase physical and philosophical transformation. Phase one opened to the public in May with expanded art and history galleries focused on engaging viewers. Phase two finishes up next year with a $12 million gallery for the natural sciences.

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1.31.2011
When charged with restoring UC Berkeley’s stately 100-year-old Durant Hall and giving it a new life as the administrative offices of the College of Letters and Sciences,… | View more

When charged with restoring UC Berkeley’s stately 100-year-old Durant Hall and giving it a new life as the administrative offices of the College of Letters and Sciences, architect Mark Cavagnero was intent on finding a balance. He wanted the restoration to feel contemporary yet respectful of the landmark building.

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1.30.2011
Whatever its other virtues, San Francisco’s young Mission Bay neighborhood has never won praise for architecture of dignified heft. Now that might change, courtesy of an unlikely… | View more

Whatever its other virtues, San Francisco’s young Mission Bay neighborhood has never won praise for architecture of dignified heft. Now that might change, courtesy of an unlikely source: the city’s Police Department. The folks in blue are the future tenants of a $164 million, 285,000-square-foot public safety building whose conceptual designs were released without fanfare this month. The question now is whether the earnest but elegant potential of the design will be realized – or if what gets built instead is another missed opportunity in the 300-acre redevelopment district.

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12.21.2010
Interior Design, UC Berkeley Durant Hall | View more

Interior Design, UC Berkeley Durant Hall

12.21.2010
Wall Street Journal, SFJAZZ | View more

Wall Street Journal, SFJAZZ

12.21.2010
The odd extremes of 2010 come down to this: Within 24 hours, the San Francisco Giants won the World Series, and the flat-earth movement captured Washington, D.C.And… | View more

The odd extremes of 2010 come down to this: Within 24 hours, the San Francisco Giants won the World Series, and the flat-earth movement captured Washington, D.C.
And when we narrow our focus to Bay Area architects, I’d be hard-pressed to name the 10 best buildings of the year – or even 10 major structures that got built.
On the bright side? The year saw neighborhood-scaled planning that teases us with the promise of sustainable, transit-friendly urbanity. Long-overdue infrastructure projects finally started construction, such as the fourth bore of the Caldecott Tunnel and the reinvention of Doyle Drive.

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12.16.2010
In 1968, the year before the Oakland Museum opened, New York Times architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable wrote: “In terms of architecture and environment, Oakland may be… | View more

In 1968, the year before the Oakland Museum opened, New York Times architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable wrote: “In terms of architecture and environment, Oakland may be the most thoughtfully revolutionary museum in the world.” Remarkably forward-thinking in its integration of planted and insulating roof terraces, the three-tiered, exposed-concrete structure seemed to grow organically from the park around it. Dedicated to California’s art, history, and natural sciences, the building’s three main levels were designed to step down a slope, with a veritable Gardens of Babylon cascading over the roof decks.

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11.1.2010
Architectural Record, Bernal Park Restroom Building | View more

Architectural Record, Bernal Park Restroom Building

11.1.2010
The College of Marin is promoting community engagement and environmental stewardship with their new sustainable academic center in Northern California. TLCD Architecture + Mark Cavagnero Associates submitted… | View more

The College of Marin is promoting community engagement and environmental stewardship with their new sustainable academic center in Northern California. TLCD Architecture + Mark Cavagnero Associates submitted the winning design for the 48,000 square-foot building, which aims to engage the community beyond the campus, to enhance and unify the existing campus configuration, and to become an educational resource for integrated sustainable design. That’s a tall order, but the new building is smartly designed to meet the challenge while showcasing an impressive array of green building strategies.

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10.26.2010
The winning design concept aims to engage the community beyond the campus, to enhance and unify the existing campus configuration, and to become an educational resource for… | View more

The winning design concept aims to engage the community beyond the campus, to enhance and unify the existing campus configuration, and to become an educational resource for integrated sustainable design. Highly visible from many directions, the New Academic Center will serve as an iconic focal point that connects the campus and the community. The new building will also help define a variety of outdoor spaces that foster diverse interaction amongst students, faculty, staff and visitors at a variety of scales.

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10.26.2010
TLCD Architecture + Mark Cavagnero Associates was selected through a competition to design the College of Marin’s New Academic Center at its Kentfield Campus. The 48,000-square-foot building,… | View more

TLCD Architecture + Mark Cavagnero Associates was selected through a competition to design the College of Marin’s New Academic Center at its Kentfield Campus. The 48,000-square-foot building, located in the northeast quadrant of the campus, will include a 200-seat auditorium, classrooms, computer labs, and faculty/administrative spaces.

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10.4.2010
SAN FRANCISCO — Even though the San Francisco Ballet starts its season in December (with “The Nutcracker”), the fall dance scene in the Bay Area is already… | View more

SAN FRANCISCO — Even though the San Francisco Ballet starts its season in December (with “The Nutcracker”), the fall dance scene in the Bay Area is already busy. At the Yerba Buena Arts Center there is a three-day conference on different genres of Indian dance. The Smuin Ballet is performing a world premiere by the much-talked-about Trey McIntyre. In Berkeley the Mark Morris Dance Group is offering a triple bill.
And ODC, the oldest contemporary dance center on the West Coast, marked the grand opening of its new theater on Thursday night with the premiere of “Architecture of Light,” choreographed by the center’s founder, Brenda Way, and her co-artistic director K T Nelson.

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10.2.2010
There were plenty of shiny surfaces to admire Thursday evening during the unveiling of ODC Theater’s $9 million renovation and expansion in the heart of the Mission… | View more

There were plenty of shiny surfaces to admire Thursday evening during the unveiling of ODC Theater’s $9 million renovation and expansion in the heart of the Mission District: new studios, green room, art gallery and even a new cafe. But the most striking surface of all, once gala guests were ushered into the performance space with its raised ceilings and high-tech equipment, was the old brick walls.
The brick walls were retained through extra expense and structural ingenuity as a tangible connection to the theater’s three-decade history. And the old walls said a lot about a roll-up-the-sleeves modern dance company that has grown into a major West Coast arts institution without sacrificing its soul.

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10.1.2010
Dwell, ODC Theater | View more

Dwell, ODC Theater

9.18.2010
San Francisco Examiner, ODC Theater | View more

San Francisco Examiner, ODC Theater

9.1.2010
Contract Magazine, Park City Museum | View more

Contract Magazine, Park City Museum

9.1.2010
arcCA, Oakland Museum of California | View more

arcCA, Oakland Museum of California

9.1.2010
Preservation Magazine, Oakland Museum of California | View more

Preservation Magazine, Oakland Museum of California

9.1.2010
When we featured the Ford Foundation Building two years ago, I interviewed the landscape architect Peter Walker, who in talking about the importance of that Kevin Roche/John… | View more

When we featured the Ford Foundation Building two years ago, I interviewed the landscape architect Peter Walker, who in talking about the importance of that Kevin Roche/John Dinkaloo-designed structure spent as much time extolling another building by those architects: the Oakland Museum of California. For our story on the restored building, I talked to Walker again. Peter has an encyclopedia grasp of landscape architecture history and the verbal ability to create a vivid picture of place. Here are his (slightly) edited memories of the building, as it was 41 years ago when it first opened.

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5.21.2010
Earlier this month, Mark Cavagnero, who just completed his renovation of the Oakland Museum, revealed his vision of the SFJAZZ Center, the country’s first freestanding jazz concert… | View more

Earlier this month, Mark Cavagnero, who just completed his renovation of the Oakland Museum, revealed his vision of the SFJAZZ Center, the country’s first freestanding jazz concert hall. The hall, which is expected to open in the fall of 2012, will be a concrete box, enclosed in a transparent glass-and-steel structure on its two public sides.

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5.16.2010
Two days after announcing plans to build a $60 million performance center in Hayes Valley, SFJAZZ held its annual gala celebration May 8 at the Four Seasons.… | View more

Two days after announcing plans to build a $60 million performance center in Hayes Valley, SFJAZZ held its annual gala celebration May 8 at the Four Seasons. The excitement was electric. And it showed: SFJAZZ raised $625,000 that night, about 50 percent more than they do during a typical annual fundraiser, according to Felice Swapp, executive operating director of SFJAZZ.

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5.16.2010
Yet the city’s most visible presenter of the genre, SFJazz (which oversees the annual San Francisco Jazz Festival, among other events), coupled with a simmering — if… | View more

Yet the city’s most visible presenter of the genre, SFJazz (which oversees the annual San Francisco Jazz Festival, among other events), coupled with a simmering — if not quite bubbling — underground scene, is working to keep jazz alive. And things may be looking up: SFJazz recently announced plans to build a 35,000-square-foot jazz performance and education center in Hayes Valley.

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5.13.2010
In the last 20 years or so, “engage the public” has become one of the most common mantras of the museum business, an injunction to curators and… | View more

In the last 20 years or so, “engage the public” has become one of the most common mantras of the museum business, an injunction to curators and designers to court their audiences with ever more seductive video displays, computer interactives and exhibition architecture. But here in a crime-challenged corner of the Bay Area, a modest civic institution dedicated to the art, history and natural sciences of California has been focused on its own version of that mission for a good deal longer.

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5.11.2010
SFJAZZ are currently planning to build the 28-year-old institution’s first permanent home. The organisation is an educational musical facility, which presents as many as 100 performances annually… | View more

SFJAZZ are currently planning to build the 28-year-old institution’s first permanent home. The organisation is an educational musical facility, which presents as many as 100 performances annually and partakes in a jazz outreach programme to Bay Area students. SFJAZZ’s new home is set to be on Franklin Street in San Francisco’s Hayes Valley, providing new artistic competition for neighbours San Francisco Symphony, San Francisco Opera and San Francisco Ballet.

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5.6.2010
SFJazz, the San Francisco arts organization, will announce plans on Friday to build its own facility dedicated to jazz: a 35,000-square-foot building in that city’s Hayes Valley… | View more

SFJazz, the San Francisco arts organization, will announce plans on Friday to build its own facility dedicated to jazz: a 35,000-square-foot building in that city’s Hayes Valley neighborhood, with two adaptable theater spaces inside.

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5.6.2010
SFJazz will build itself a permanent home in San Francisco – the first stand-alone major facility in the country devoted to the swinging American art form. The… | View more

SFJazz will build itself a permanent home in San Francisco – the first stand-alone major facility in the country devoted to the swinging American art form. The nonprofit organization unveils plans today for the SFJazz Center, a three-story, 35,000-square-foot glass, steel and concrete structure that will rise at the corner of Fell and Franklin streets in bustling Hayes Valley, just down the street from Davies Symphony Hall and the Opera House. The auto-repair center on the site will be torn down.

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5.1.2010
Makeover understates the exhilarating effect achieved by renovation of the Gallery of California Art and the fresh deployment of its contents as the Oakland Museum of California… | View more

Makeover understates the exhilarating effect achieved by renovation of the Gallery of California Art and the fresh deployment of its contents as the Oakland Museum of California – two-thirds of it, anyway – reopens today after a two-year renovation.
The museum gives its answer – a bracing one – to the question of how a 21st century cultural institution should use its resources.
As if mindful of the appalling decline in California public schools, the Oakland Museum has embraced its role as cultural educator with a surprisingly light, inviting touch.

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5.1.2010
San Francisco Magazine, Oakland Museum of California | View more

San Francisco Magazine, Oakland Museum of California

5.1.2010
Last year, this magazine launched the Architect 50, our twist on a top firms ranking—one that recognizes ecological commitment and design quality as much as profitability when measuring… | View more

Last year, this magazine launched the Architect 50, our twist on a top firms ranking—one that recognizes ecological commitment and design quality as much as profitability when measuring the country’s very best A, AE, and AEC firms. And what a year we chose for the debut.
Esteemed firms—including, but not limited to, the global “alphabets”—had seen their revenues fall sharply and responded with layoffs. Capital was scarce; new projects were exceptionally tough to win, and pencils-down orders on projects in hand became all too common. Somehow, though, we were able to produce a robust ranking our first time out. It helped that firms were being assessed on their revenues from 2008, a year that a lot of firms started (at least) with a backlog.

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4.30.2010
In our age of architectural pyrotechnics, the Oakland Museum of California looks more revolutionary now than when it opened in 1969.Rather than strive for visual impact, the… | View more

In our age of architectural pyrotechnics, the Oakland Museum of California looks more revolutionary now than when it opened in 1969.
Rather than strive for visual impact, the three long floors of concrete-framed galleries terrace into and up from the ground, forming a sort of geological maze. The surface is blurred by trees and shrubs, a forerunner of today’s eco-hip green roofs.
Now the city-owned institution has reopened after a $58 million renovation that makes the ambitiously demure structure more inviting than ever – though it also confirms the limits of even the best of the socially aware modernism of the 1960s.

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4.29.2010
Longtime visitors to the Oakland Museum of California’s three-tiered art, California history and natural history collections are in for a pleasant shock this weekend when the renovated… | View more

Longtime visitors to the Oakland Museum of California’s three-tiered art, California history and natural history collections are in for a pleasant shock this weekend when the renovated institution reopens Saturday for a free, 31-hour nonstop celebration this weekend. It’s 31 hours because, as one might recall from school, California was the 31st state, admitted to the union on Sept. 9, 1850.

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4.29.2010
After a well-publicized two-year renovation, the Oakland Museum reintroduces itself to the community on May 1 and 2 with the unveiling of its $58 million dollar facelift,… | View more

After a well-publicized two-year renovation, the Oakland Museum reintroduces itself to the community on May 1 and 2 with the unveiling of its $58 million dollar facelift, over 4,800 square feet of new gallery space, and a 31-hour extravaganza featuring free public programs and performances by the San Francisco Lesbian/Gay Freedom Band.

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4.28.2010
Architect’s Newspaper, Mark Cavagnero Associates | View more

Architect’s Newspaper, Mark Cavagnero Associates

4.26.2010
Dwell, Oakland Museum of California | View more

Dwell, Oakland Museum of California

4.21.2010
OAKLAND –When the Oakland Museum of California unveiled its sprawling and distinctive new building for art, history and natural sciences 41 years ago — a terraced, walled-garden structure that… | View more

OAKLAND –When the Oakland Museum of California unveiled its sprawling and distinctive new building for art, history and natural sciences 41 years ago — a terraced, walled-garden structure that became an instant national landmark — a review in The Times opened with this observation: “The ’60s saw Los Angeles firmly established as California’s art capital.” The review made the point that although L.A. had the most challenging new art, institutionally, the Bay Area was on a roll. Though true, the comment also implied the long-standing rivalry between the state’s northern and southern precincts.

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4.21.2010
In years past, a museum visit has often meant an observational stroll, a rich but somewhat passive experience, accompanied by the occasional whisper and the inevitable tired… | View more

In years past, a museum visit has often meant an observational stroll, a rich but somewhat passive experience, accompanied by the occasional whisper and the inevitable tired feet. Not so in the Oakland Museum of California. When it reopens Saturday, after a two-year, $62.2 million renovation, visitors will be encouraged to speak up, discuss, offer feedback on the exhibits, lounge in a leather club chair to ponder a painting or pull up a “pouf” — a portable pillow-chair visitors can pick up and plop down in front of any exhibit — all because the 21st century Oakland museum experience is as much about the observer as the objects on display.

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4.18.2010
Oakland Museum of California is weeks from reopening and a whisper away from its capital campaign goal.Despite the recession, the renovated museum will have raised over $62… | View more

Oakland Museum of California is weeks from reopening and a whisper away from its capital campaign goal.
Despite the recession, the renovated museum will have raised over $62 million of a $62.2 million goal by its May 1, 2010, grand re-opening. It has far since exceeded its original $58.2 million campaign goal.

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4.11.2010
Sometimes we think it’s a long way to get to Oakland from San Francisco, but in reality a trip to the Oakland Museum of California is just… | View more

Sometimes we think it’s a long way to get to Oakland from San Francisco, but in reality a trip to the Oakland Museum of California is just a couple of BART stations away. As the museum prepares for its May 1 reopening, art critic Kenneth Baker gives background on the museum’s history, Jesse Hamlin talks about the unique way the exhibits will be arranged and staff writer Sam Whiting compares getting to the museum with going to the Legion of Honor (Page 20). And speaking of traveling over the Bay Bridge, Theater Critic Robert Hurwitt interviews prolific director Les Waters, whose latest endeavor is Berkeley Rep’s “Girlfriend” based on Matthew Sweet’s album (Page 24).

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4.1.2010
The Registry, Park City Museum | View more

The Registry, Park City Museum

2.19.2010
San Francisco Business Times, Mark Cavagnero Associates | View more

San Francisco Business Times, Mark Cavagnero Associates

11.30.2009
In the future, will there be a Brutalist Revival? Decked out with stainless steel trimmings by Mark Cavagnero Associates, the Oakland Museum of California is getting ready… | View more

In the future, will there be a Brutalist Revival? Decked out with stainless steel trimmings by Mark Cavagnero Associates, the Oakland Museum of California is getting ready to usher in a Brutalist appreciation. Or at least a bit of nostalgia for a time when architects couldn’t get enough of the monolithic purity of craggy concrete, before they realized what the environmental costs of melting down rock and reforming it were. The 1969 complex is undergoing the first phase of a $58 million retrofit and will reopen in May 2010.

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10.1.2009
Architectural Record, Sava Pool | View more

Architectural Record, Sava Pool

10.1.2009
arcCA, Sava Pool | View more

arcCA, Sava Pool

9.1.2009
Contract Magazine, Chronicle Books | View more

Contract Magazine, Chronicle Books

9.1.2009
Urban Land, Sava Pool | View more

Urban Land, Sava Pool

6.1.2009
Contract Magazine, Sava Pool | View more

Contract Magazine, Sava Pool

6.1.2009
Architectural Record, Marin Country Day School Entry Pavilion | View more

Architectural Record, Marin Country Day School Entry Pavilion

5.1.2009
Architectural Record, Chronicle Books | View more

Architectural Record, Chronicle Books

4.22.2009
Architect’s Newspaper, Mark Cavagnero Associates | View more

Architect’s Newspaper, Mark Cavagnero Associates

4.1.2009
The Registry, Chronicle Books | View more

The Registry, Chronicle Books

4.1.2009
California Home & Design, Trinity School Enrichment Center | View more

California Home & Design, Trinity School Enrichment Center

4.1.2009
The Registry, Mark Cavagnero Associates | View more

The Registry, Mark Cavagnero Associates

4.1.2009
California Home & Design, Chronicle Books | View more

California Home & Design, Chronicle Books

4.1.2009
The Registry, Hiroshi Sugimoto Exhibit at the deYoung Museum | View more

The Registry, Hiroshi Sugimoto Exhibit at the deYoung Museum

4.1.2009
California Home & Design, Hiroshi Sugimoto Exhibit at the deYoung Museum | View more

California Home & Design, Hiroshi Sugimoto Exhibit at the deYoung Museum

1.13.2009
The best view at San Francisco’s new Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District, appropriately enough, is from the water.From that inviting perspective, the eucalyptus trees of… | View more

The best view at San Francisco’s new Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District, appropriately enough, is from the water.
From that inviting perspective, the eucalyptus trees of Stern Grove seem to brush the 24-foot-high glass walls. Above, the water is reflected off glossy acoustic panels – a shimmer complemented by the rich blue tiles covering one wall.
Even when the fog rolls in from the nearby ocean to blur the scenery, the gray mist nuzzled against gray concrete is as soothing as the womb.
All this makes Sava Pool a great place to swim laps, and a building for our time. The assertive presence of the complex, the dignified tone it sets, bears testimony that 21st century government can still craft public works that are likely to pay dividends within a community for decades to come.

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1.1.2009
Construction Specifier, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

Construction Specifier, Community School of Music and Arts

1.1.2009
Contract Magazine, Hiroshi Sugimoto Exhibit at the deYoung Museum | View more

Contract Magazine, Hiroshi Sugimoto Exhibit at the deYoung Museum

10.29.2008
California Home & Design, Clovis Memorial District Conference Center | View more

California Home & Design, Clovis Memorial District Conference Center

10.29.2008
Mark Cavagnero Associates designed a 1,200-square-foot expansion for one of the K–5 school’s existing 1960s Bay style buildings, as well as a new 4,800-square-foot Enrichment Center containing… | View more

Mark Cavagnero Associates designed a 1,200-square-foot expansion for one of the K–5 school’s existing 1960s Bay style buildings, as well as a new 4,800-square-foot Enrichment Center containing classrooms for music, science, and the arts.
The project, pointed out Cavagnero, creates a much-needed connection between the school and its lush new yard and play areas, which are separated by a steep slope. A dramatic, canopied stair between the existing and new buildings has become the center of campus life. Large landings on either side of the stair as well as weaving terraces serve as perfect places to rest or eat lunch, and also function as places to sit for assemblies.

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10.1.2008
The original Clovis Memorial District conference center, which had been incrementally added to over the years, housed a number of meeting rooms, but lacked a central entry,… | View more

The original Clovis Memorial District conference center, which had been incrementally added to over the years, housed a number of meeting rooms, but lacked a central entry, or gathering space. The renovation of the conference center provided an opportunity to expand the facilities and correct the building’s deficiencies, while giving the organization a much-needed identity to support its commemoration of veterans within the Clovis area.

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9.1.2008
SOMA, Mark Cavagnero Associates | View more

SOMA, Mark Cavagnero Associates

6.1.2008
Metropolis, Chronicle Books | View more

Metropolis, Chronicle Books

2.1.2008
When New York–based photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto first arrived in his adopted city in the mid-1970s, he spent long nights in empty cinemas, capturing the entire running time… | View more

When New York–based photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto first arrived in his adopted city in the mid-1970s, he spent long nights in empty cinemas, capturing the entire running time of films in single long-exposure shots. Sugimoto’s silver screens radiate ethereal white light in a deceptively simple effect achieved through exacting effort—and the same can be said of the 2007 Sugimoto retrospective designed by San Francisco’s de Young Museum in consultation with architecture firm Mark Cavagnero Associates.

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6.1.2005
Umran Magazine, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

Umran Magazine, Community School of Music and Arts

3.1.2005
California Home & Design, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

California Home & Design, Community School of Music and Arts

2.1.2005
Contract Magazine, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

Contract Magazine, Community School of Music and Arts

11.22.2004
Business Week, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

Business Week, Community School of Music and Arts

11.18.2004
There’s nothing easy about the architecture of the Community School of Music and Arts in Mountain View — no lyrical drama to catch the eye, no historic… | View more

There’s nothing easy about the architecture of the Community School of Music and Arts in Mountain View — no lyrical drama to catch the eye, no historic touches to soothe the nerves.
It is what it is: bare concrete lightened — just barely — by slats of pale cedar and large panes of glass. The surfaces are flat, and the only break in the right angles comes where the roof slants upward at an acoustically precise 28 degrees.
The fact that a building so uncompromisingly direct opened this year in the Bay Area — a region where second-guessing is sacred — could be taken as a sign that modern architecture is back in vogue or that the suburbs are now open to daring design. But the real reason is more subtle: long-term relationships and old-fashioned trust.

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8.1.2004
Archiworld, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

Archiworld, Community School of Music and Arts

3.1.2004
Contract Magazine, Marin Community Foundation Headquarters | View more

Contract Magazine, Marin Community Foundation Headquarters

3.1.2004
San Jose Mercury News, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

San Jose Mercury News, Community School of Music and Arts

3.1.2004
arcCA, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

arcCA, Community School of Music and Arts

3.1.2004
Architectural Record, Community School of Music and Arts | View more

Architectural Record, Community School of Music and Arts

3.1.2003
Contract Magazine, Brava Theater Center | View more

Contract Magazine, Brava Theater Center

1.2001
Retrospective of Courthouse Design, Mammoth Lakes Courthouse | View more

Retrospective of Courthouse Design, Mammoth Lakes Courthouse

11.1.1999
Interior Design, Zero Degrees Cafe | View more

Interior Design, Zero Degrees Cafe

9.12.1999
San Francisco Examiner, Rafael Film Center | View more

San Francisco Examiner, Rafael Film Center

6.1.1999
San Francisco Magazine, Headlands Center for the Arts | View more

San Francisco Magazine, Headlands Center for the Arts

5.1.1999
Architecture, Headlands Center for the Arts | View more

Architecture, Headlands Center for the Arts

4.24.1999
This is among the most handsome restaurants I’ve ever seen; there are modern art museums that should look so good. Carved from a Barbary Coast warehouse, it… | View more

This is among the most handsome restaurants I’ve ever seen; there are modern art museums that should look so good. Carved from a Barbary Coast warehouse, it features brick, blond wood, ironwork, white fabric, stainless steel and sheets of light, much of it natural. We ate there on a dark, rainy day, and the visual experience was still exhilarating. And unlike some ultramodern spaces, this one is comfortable.

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4.11.1999
San Francisco Examiner, Headlands Center for the Arts | View more

San Francisco Examiner, Headlands Center for the Arts

12.1.1998
Esquire Magazine, mc2 Restaurant | View more

Esquire Magazine, mc2 Restaurant

11.1.1998
W Magazine, mc2 Restaurant | View more

W Magazine, mc2 Restaurant

11.1.1998
Architectural Record, mc2 Restaurant | View more

Architectural Record, mc2 Restaurant

10.25.1998
San Francisco Examiner, mc2 Restaurant | View more

San Francisco Examiner, mc2 Restaurant

10.1.1998
Stoneworld, San Francisco Civic Center Courthouse | View more

Stoneworld, San Francisco Civic Center Courthouse

9.1.1998
San Francisco Magazine, mc2 Restaurant | View more

San Francisco Magazine, mc2 Restaurant

2.1.1998
San Francisco Examiner, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum | View more

San Francisco Examiner, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum

4.1.1997
Architectural Record, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum | View more

Architectural Record, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum

11.1996
Fine Arts, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum | View more

Fine Arts, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum

12.20.1995
Pacific Sun, Rafael Film Center | View more

Pacific Sun, Rafael Film Center

12.1.1995
Architecture, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum | View more

Architecture, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum

11.16.1995
New York Times, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum | View more

New York Times, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum

11.1.1995
San Francisco Examiner, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum | View more

San Francisco Examiner, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum

11.1.1995
Triptych Magazine, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum | View more

Triptych Magazine, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum

5.1.1995
Triptych Magazine, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum | View more

Triptych Magazine, California Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum

1.1.1992
San Francisco Magazine, M.H. deYoung Memorial Museum | View more

San Francisco Magazine, M.H. deYoung Memorial Museum